Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Complete Sonatas for Keyboard and Violin, Vol.2 – Gary Cooper, Rachel Podger (2005) [nativeDSDmusicDSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz + FLAC 24bit/192kHz]

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Complete Sonatas for Keyboard and Violin, Vol.2 – Gary Cooper, Rachel Podger (2005) 
DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz | Time – 01:11:06 minutes | 2,89 + 2.43 GB | Genre: Classical
Official Digital Download – Source: nativeDSDmusic |  © Channel Classics Records B.V.
Recorded: The Church of Our Lady, St Mary, South Creake, UK, October 2004

Rachel & I feel that, by using a fortepiano throughout, we present a sort of musical ‘level playing field’ with regard to our choice of Mozart’s sonatas included on this disc – spanning as it does such a huge portion of the composer’s life & musical development. While K.6 may at first appear to the listener as amiable juvenilia, sitting as it does alongside a sonata of such undoubted breadth & maturity as K.481, we firmly believe that allowing Mozart’s early – and outstanding – ventures into this genre to speak for themselves by using using the same instruments throughout, we hope to draw attention to his early work in the best way – in a way that is not only so suggestive of what would in time follow, but also seeks to demonstrate the eight year old’s already fecund imagination and uncanny sense of musical line. –Gary Cooper

 

“The interaction between Rachel Podger and the gifted fortepianist Gary Cooper is no less than extraordinary. They succeed in cracking a formidable code that leads the listener to understand the musical connection between single phrases and larger sections within the sonata form Mozart perfected. (…) (…) Podger and Cooper’s masterly first endeavour captures the heart and the mind of the master.” –The Strad

“The outstanding work on this second instalment is the big E flat Sonata K481. Cooper and Podger provide a broad performance of its wonderful slow movement that really plumbs its depths, applying ornamentation in a way that Mozart might well have done himself. Cooper and Podger are superb in the G major K301, with an account of the minor-mode siciliano-like episode in its finale that’s both expressive and irresistibly lilting.” –BBC Music Magazine

(more…)

Dvorak, Janacek – Symphony No. 8, Symphonic Suite – Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Manfred Honeck (2014) [nativeDSDmusic DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz]

Dvorak, Janacek – Symphony No. 8, Symphonic Suite – Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Manfred Honeck (2014)
DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz | Time – 01:02:02 minutes | 6,12 GB | Genre: Classical
Official Digital Download – Source: nativeDSDmusic |  © Reference Recordings
Recorded: October 11-13, 2013

Nominated for 2015 GRAMMY Award! Best Orchestral Performance.

For more than 116 years, the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra has been known for its artistic excellence. The PSO has a rich history of the world’s finest conductors and musicians. Past conductors include the legendary names of Reiner, Steinberg, Previn, Maazel,and other greats. This tradition was furthered in fall 2008, when celebrated Austrian conductor Manfred Honeck became Music Director of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra..
The PSO is critically acclaimed as one of the world’s greatest orchestras, and has completed more than 36 international tours, including 20 European tours, eight trips to the Far East, and two to South America. The PSO was the first American orchestra to perform at the Vatican in January 2004 for the late Pope John Paul II, as part of the Pontiff’s Silver Jubilee celebration.
The PSO also has a long history in the areas of recordings and radio concerts. As early as 1936, the PSO broadcast coast-to-coast, receiving increased national attention in 1982 when it began network radio broadcasts on Public Radio International. The PRI series with the PSO can be heard on Classical WQED-FM 89.3 in Pittsburgh. Many PSO recordings remain in print and available, and they have won critical acclaim and many awards..
This release and the entire “Pittsburgh Live!”series are recorded and mastered by the team at Soundmirror, whose outstanding orchestral, solo, opera, and chamber recordings have received over 70 GRAMMY nominations and awards! Soundmirror has recorded for every major classical record label, now including Reference Recordings.

(more…)

Johannes Brahms – Symphony No. 1, Hungarian Dance & Haydn Variations – Budapest Festival Orchestra, Ivan Fischer (2009) [nativeDSDmusic DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz + FLAC 24bit/192kHz]

Johannes Brahms – Symphony No. 1, Hungarian Dance & Haydn Variations – Budapest Festival Orchestra, Ivan Fischer (2009)
DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz | Time – 01:07:27 minutes | 2,66 + 2.74 GB | Genre: Classical
Official Digital Download – Source: nativeDSDmusic |  © Channel Classics Records B.V.
Recorded: Palace of Arts, Budapest, January 2009

“An orchestra musician is an artist, not an employee, and artists must be given the chance to take initiatives and to be creative. Only an orchestra of true artists – making music as a highly disciplined team – is able to realize the dreams of the composers and pass on an uplifting experience to the audience, touching all listeners deep in their heart. This is our aim for which the Budapest Festival Orchestra has been created.” –Iván Fischer

(more…)

Bela Bartok – Bluebeard’s Castle – Budapest Festival Orchestra, Ivan Fischer (2011) [nativeDSDmusic DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz]

Bela Bartok – Bluebeard’s Castle – Budapest Festival Orchestra, Ivan Fischer (2011)
DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz | Time – 00:55:18 minutes | 2,19 GB | Genre: Classical
Official Digital Download – Source: nativeDSDmusic |  © Channel Classics Records B.V.
Recorded: 16-19 August 2002 at Italian Institute, Budapest

Despite occasional successful stagings of this opera, it is concert performances that stir up the feelings of audiences most. I have witnessed many times in performances of this psycho-drama that listeners, staring at the faces of the two singers for sixty minutes, or following a surtitled or printed libretto translation during Bartók’s deeply emotional music, were confronted with themselves. The prologue is very important; this is in fact a story about us. Usually, after the opera has ended, discussions break out, dividing men and women. Whereas everybody seems
to understand why Judit cannot resist her desire to open all the doors, Bluebeard’s character remains controversial. Is it right or wrong, necessary or unnecessary to keep certain doors closed? Why does he need to lock Judit up after she has discovered his secrets? Is the blood real, or does it exist only in Judit’s fearful imagination?
This Bluebeard is not a killer, even if he has a bad reputation and Judita sees blood everywhere. All the earlier wives are alive in his heart, behind closed doors. Bartók, who was himself a closed, shy man, seems to have been fascinated by strange-looking characters who turn out to feel endless love. This links Bluebeard to the Miraculous Mandarin.
I am very grateful to Mr Vikárius and Mr Somfai of the Bartók archive in Budapest, who drew my attention to a number of errors in the printed score which we have been able to correct in this new recording.
I also want to thank the Budapest State Opera, who lent us the very rare keyboard xylophone which gives the torture chamber scene its authentic colour. –Iván Fischer

(more…)