Tag Archives: David Bowie

David Bowie – Diamond Dogs (1974/2016) [FLAC 24-192]

David Bowie – Diamond Dogs (1974/2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time – 38:28 minutes | 1,43 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Masters, Official Digital Download – Source:  | Front Cover | © Parlophone UK

David Bowie’s 1974 concept album remastered. Diamond Dogs was Bowie’s eighth studio album and features singles “Rebel Rebel,” “Diamond Dogs,” and “1984.”

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David Bowie – Who Can I Be Now [1974-1976] (2016) [HDTracks 24-192]

David Bowie – Who Can I Be Now? [1974-1976] (2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/192 kHz | Time – 03:49:57 minutes | 8,58 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks | Artwork: Digital booklet | © Parlophone UK

The boxed set, which is named after a track recorded in 1974 but not officially released until the 1990s, includes a huge set of studio recordings of some of David Bowie’s most memorable tracks. Driven by an entirely deeper dynamic than most pop artists, David Bowie inhabits a very special world of extraordinary sounds and endless vision. Unwilling to stay on the treadmill of rock legend and avoiding the descent into ever demeaning and decreasing circles of cliché, Bowie writes and performs what he wants, when he wants. His absence from the endless list of “important events” has just fuelled interest. Constant speculation about what the guy was up to has even led some to wonder if this is his greatest reinvention ever.

Digital Download 192kHz/24bit Boxed Set:
Diamond Dogs (Remastered)
David Live (Original Mix) (Remastered)*
The Gouster*
Young Americans (Remastered)
Station To Station (Remastered)
* Exclusive to WHO CAN I BE NOW? (1974-1976)

Parlophone Records are proud to announce David Bowie – Who Can I Be Now?, the second in a series of box sets spanning his career from 1969. The box set features all of the material officially released by Bowie during the so-called American phase of his career from 1974 to 1976. The boxed set, which is named after a track recorded in 1974 but not officially released until the 1990s, includes a huge set of studio recordings of some of David Bowie’s most memorable tracks.

A sequel to the 2015 box Five Years 1969-1973, 2016’s Who Can I Be Now? (1974-1976) covers just three years but this stretch in the mid-’70s happens to be the peak of David Bowie’s superstardom. That much can be gleaned from the number of albums within the set: three studio albums – Diamond Dogs, Young Americans, Station to Station, each released in a subsequent year – along with the double live album David Live from 1974. Four albums in three years is plenty but to that core canon Who Can I Be Now? add an early version of Young Americans called The Gouster. The latter seems to bend the rules of this extensive Bowie catalog reissue project, which is to preserve the officially released canon and keep unreleased tracks – whether they surfaced on the ’90s Rykodisc reissues or remain unheard – locked up in the vaults. The Gouster contains “Who Can I Be Now?” and “It’s Gonna Be Me,” both originally released on the 1990 Ryko edition of Young Americans, along with alternate versions of “Can You Hear Me?” and “Right,” plus the disco version of “John, I’m Only Dancing,” but otherwise it plays like Young Americans, only not quite as good. Furthermore, its presence calls into question why the unreleased outtake “Shilling the Rubes” is left behind alongside the “Dodo” that showed up on the Ryko CD of Diamond Dogs: if the door is opened for some outtakes, it’s hard not to miss those that are absent. Still, this is quibbling. The Who Can I Be Now? box set remains as beautifully produced as Five Years, and a deep dive into its contents produces many rewards. Perhaps the alternate album mixes are only slightly different, but it’s hard not to be impressed by the rapid development of Bowie’s music during these three years. The distance between Diamond Dogs and Station to Station is vast, and the addition of the live albums accentuates how deeply he cared for strong, deeply etched funk to offset his art. Listening to all this music in a concentrated blast, such progression is a wonder to behold.

Continue reading David Bowie – Who Can I Be Now [1974-1976] (2016) [HDTracks 24-192]

David Bowie – Young Americans (1975/2016) [FLAC 24-192]

David Bowie – Young Americans (1975/2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/192 kHz | Time – 00:40:52 minutes | 1,53 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: | Front Cover | © Rhino

Driven by an entirely deeper dynamic than most pop artists, David Bowie inhabits a very special world of extraordinary sounds and endless vision. Unwilling to stay on the treadmill of rock legend and avoiding the descent into ever demeaning and decreasing circles of cliché, Bowie writes and performs what he wants, when he wants. His absence from the endless list of “important events” has just fuelled interest. Constant speculation about what the guy was up to has even led some to wonder if this is his greatest reinvention ever.

Continue reading David Bowie – Young Americans (1975/2016) [FLAC 24-192]

David Bowie – Blackstar (2016) [HDTracks 24-96]

David Bowie – Blackstar (2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz | Time – 41:17 minutes | 908 MB | Genre: Rock
Official Digital Download – Source: HDTracks.com | @ Columbia

Blackstar (stylised as ★ ) is the twenty-sixth studio album by David Bowie. It was released on 8 January 2016, the date of Bowie’s 69th birthday, and features seven songs. The title track was released as a single on 20 November 2015 and was used as the opening music for the television series The Last Panthers. “Lazarus” was released on 17 December 2015 as a digital download and received its world premiere on BBC Radio 6 Music’s Steve Lamacq the same day.

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David Bowie – The Next Day Extra (2013) [AcousticSounds 24-96]

David Bowie – The Next Day Extra (2013)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz | Time – 01:33:52 minutes | 1,92 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: AcousticSounds | Front Cover | © Iso/Columbia
Recorded: 2010–12, The Magic Shop & Human Worldwide Studios, New York City

The Next Day Extra is the collector’s edition of David Bowie’s critically acclaimed 2013 album The Next Day. This package includes 24 audio tracks. Included is the original 14 track album, as well as the three tracks from the original deluxe edition of The Next Day, plus four new studio tracks, a bonus track (“God Bless The Girl”), and two new remixes.

One of the remixes is done by famed musician/producer/DJ James Murphy, who reworked “Love Is Lost” into a 10-plus minute epic.

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David Bowie – Five Years 1969-1973 (2015) [Qobuz 24-96]

David Bowie – Five Years 1969-1973 (2015)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz | Time – 04:03:21 minutes | 4,91 GB | Genre: Rock
Studio Master, Official Digital Download – Source: Q0buz | Digital booklet | @ Parlophone Records, Warner Music

The musical chameleon’s 6 studio albums from 1969-1973. In just a short amount of time you can see Bowie turn and surprise at each album. The accompanying book features technical notes about each album from the producers Tony Visconti and Ken Scott, an original press review for each album and a short foreword by an artist of note. Albums included: David Bowie (aka Space Oddity), The Man Who Sold The World, Hunky Dory, The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust And The Spiders From Mars, Aladdin Sane, Pin Ups.

The first in a series of career-spanning comprehensive box sets, Five Years 1969-1973 chronicles the beginning of David Bowie’s legend by boxing all of his officially released music during those early years. This amounts to six studio albums — 1969’s David Bowie (aka Space Oddity); 1970’s The Man Who Sold the World; 1971’s Hunky Dory; 1972’s The Rise & Fall of Ziggy Stardust & the Spiders from Mars; Aladdin Sane, and Pin Ups (both from 1973); a pair of live albums (Ziggy Stardust: The Motion Picture Soundtrack and Live in Santa Monica ’72, both released long after these five years) and a two-CD collection of non-LP tracks called Re:Call, plus Ken Scott’s 2003 mix of Rise & Fall of Ziggy Stardust. That list suggests how “officially released” is a guideline that’s easily bent. Live in Santa Monica ’72 is a bootleg that became canonical in 1995, and the soundtrack to Ziggy Stardust didn’t appear until 1983, but both are welcome because they either showcase the Spiders from Mars at their prime (Santa Monica) or at their end (Ziggy). Considering the number of edits, alternates, and B-sides Bowie released during this period, Re:Call is also a needed supplement, but it has some willful blind spots due to that “officially released” maxim: namely, any outtake released as a bonus on the Rykodisc reissues of the early ’90s, including such major items as “Lightning Frightening,” “Bombers,” and “Sweet Head.” Such absences are an irritant but not a major one because the box itself is quite handsome — whether in its CD or LP incarnation, each record is packaged as a replica of its original release — and the remastering is excellent, with Space Oddity, The Man Who Sold the World, Hunky Dory, and Pin Ups given upgrades to match the anniversary remasters of Ziggy and Aladdin Sane from the 2010s. The improved audio alone makes Five Years 1969-1973 a desirable box for serious Bowie fans, but the whole set does justice to one of the great creative runs in rock history.

Continue reading David Bowie – Five Years 1969-1973 (2015) [Qobuz 24-96]

David Bowie – The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars 2003 (1972) [SACD 2003] {SACD-R + FLAC 24-88.2}

David Bowie – The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars 2003 (1972) [SACD 2003]
PS3 Rip | ISO | SACD DST64 2.0 & DST64 5.1 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 38:47 minutes | Scans included | 2,50 GB
or FLAC 2.0 Stereo (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | 38:31 min | Scans included | 810 MB
Features 2.0 Stereo and 5.1 multichannel surround.

Borrowing heavily from Marc Bolan’s glam rock and the future shock of A Clockwork Orange, David Bowie reached back to the heavy rock of The Man Who Sold the World for The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. Constructed as a loose concept album about an androgynous alien rock star named Ziggy Stardust, the story falls apart quickly, yet Bowie’s fractured, paranoid lyrics are evocative of a decadent, decaying future, and the music echoes an apocalyptic, nuclear dread. Fleshing out the off-kilter metallic mix with fatter guitars, genuine pop songs, string sections, keyboards, and a cinematic flourish, Ziggy Stardust is a glitzy array of riffs, hooks, melodrama, and style and the logical culmination of glam. Mick Ronson plays with a maverick flair that invigorates rockers like “Suffragette City,” “Moonage Daydream,” and “Hang Onto Yourself,” while “Lady Stardust,” “Five Years,” and “Rock ‘n’ Roll Suicide” have a grand sense of staged drama previously unheard of in rock & roll. And that self-conscious sense of theater is part of the reason why Ziggy Stardust sounds so foreign. Bowie succeeds not in spite of his pretensions but because of them, and Ziggy Stardust — familiar in structure, but alien in performance — is the first time his vision and execution met in such a grand, sweeping fashion.

Continue reading David Bowie – The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars 2003 (1972) [SACD 2003] {SACD-R + FLAC 24-88.2}

David Bowie – Reality (2003) {SACD-R + FLAC 24-88.2}

David Bowie – Reality (2003) [SACD 2.0 & 5.1]
PS3 Rip | ISO | SACD DSD64 2.0 & DST64 5.1 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 49:19 minutes | Scans included | 4,24 GB
or FLAC 2.0 Stereo (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | 49:11 min | Scans included | 1,0 GB
Features 2.0 Stereo and 5.1 multichannel surround.

Instead of being a one-off comeback, 2002′s Heathen turned out to be where David Bowie settled into a nice groove for his latter-day career, if 2003′s Reality is any indication. Working once again with producer Tony Visconti, Bowie again returns to a sound from the past, yet tweaks it enough to make it seem modern, not retro. Last time around, he concentrated on his early-’70s sound, creating an amalgam of Hunky Dory through Heroes. With Reality, he picks up where he left off, choosing to revise the sound of Heroes through Scary Monsters, with the latter functioning as a sonic blueprint for the album. Basically, Reality is a well-adjusted Scary Monsters, minus the paranoia and despair — and if those two ingredients were key to the feeling and effect of that album, it’s a credit to Bowie that he’s found a way to retain the sound and approach of that record, but turn it bright and cheerful and keep it interesting. Since part of the appeal of Monsters is the creeping sense of unease and its icy detachment, it would seem that a warmer, mature variation on that would not be successful, but Bowie and Visconti are sharp record-makers, retaining what works — layers of voices and guitars, sleek keyboards, coolly propulsive rhythms — and tying them to another strong set of songs. Like Heathen, the songs deliberately recall classic Bowie by being both tuneful and adventurous, both hallmarks of his ’70s work. If this isn’t as indelible as anything he cut during that decade, that’s merely the fate of mature work by veteran rockers. So, Reality doesn’t have the shock of the new, but it does offer some surprises, chief among them the inventive, assured production and memorable songs. It’s a little artier than Heathen, but similar in its feel and just as satisfying. Both records are testaments to the fact that veteran rockers can make satisfyingly classicist records without resulting in nostalgia or getting too comfortable. With any luck, Bowie will retain this level of quality for a long time to come.

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David Bowie – Scary Monsters (1980) [SACD 2003] {SACD-R + FLAC 24-88.2}

David Bowie – Scary Monsters (1980) [SACD 2003]
PS3 Rip | ISO | SACD DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 45:29 minutes | Scans included | 1,84 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 968 MB

David Bowie returned to relatively conventional rock & roll with Scary Monsters, an album that effectively acts as an encapsulation of all his ’70s experiments. Reworking glam rock themes with avant-garde synth flourishes, and reversing the process as well, Bowie creates dense but accessible music throughout Scary Monsters. Though it doesn’t have the vision of his other classic records, it wasn’t designed to break new ground — it was created as the culmination of Bowie’s experimental genre-shifting of the ’70s. As a result, Scary Monsters is Bowie’s last great album. While the music isn’t far removed from the post-punk of the early ’80s, it does sound fresh, hip, and contemporary, which is something Bowie lost over the course of the ’80s.

Continue reading David Bowie – Scary Monsters (1980) [SACD 2003] {SACD-R + FLAC 24-88.2}

David Bowie – Let’s Dance (1983) [SACD 2003] {SACD-R + FLAC 24-88.2}

David Bowie – Let’s Dance (1983) [SACD 2003]
PS3 Rip | ISO | SACD DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 39:47 minutes | Scans included | 1,61 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 831 MB

After summing up his maverick tendencies on Scary Monsters, David Bowie aimed for the mainstream with Let’s Dance. Hiring Chic guitarist Nile Rodgers as a co-producer, Bowie created a stylish, synthesized post-disco dance music that was equally informed by classic soul and the emerging new romantic subgenre of new wave, which was ironically heavily inspired by Bowie himself. Let’s Dance comes tearing out of the gate, propulsed by the skittering “Modern Love,” the seductively menacing “China Girl,” and the brittle funk of the title track. All three songs became international hits, and for good reason — they’re catchy, accessible pop songs that have just enough of an alien edge to make them distinctive. However, that careful balance is quickly thrown off by a succession of pleasant but unremarkable plastic soul workouts. “Cat People” and a cover of Metro’s “Criminal World” are relatively strong songs, but the remainder of the album indicates that Bowie was entering a songwriting slump. However, the three hits were enough to make the album a massive hit, and their power hasn’t diminished over the years, even if the rest of the record sounds like an artifact.

Continue reading David Bowie – Let’s Dance (1983) [SACD 2003] {SACD-R + FLAC 24-88.2}