Amanda Lear – Collection (1977-2011) [FLAC]

Amanda Lear - Collection (1977-2011) [FLAC] Download

Artist: Amanda Lear
Album: Collection
Genre: Pop
Year: 1977-2011
Size: ~ 11.4 gb
Source: CDs
Format: APE (image + .cue)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

Amanda Lear first surfaced in the early ’70s as a fetishistically clothed album-cover model for Roxy Music. She was said to be a transsexual but, as she told Interview magazine, that was just a ruse dreamed up by her sponsor, David Bowie, to draw attention. Her importance to disco fans, however, began in 1977, when she recorded I Am a Photograph in Germany with production help from Tony Monn. I Am a Photograph is the first of six sleazy, hard-to-find albums in which she flaunts a voice so heavy with low notes it makes one wonder if she really isn’t a man after all. But Lear’s slow notes are simply an exaggeration of the whiskey-voiced sultriness created by Marlene Dietrich. That isn’t to say, however, that Lear’s lyrics — or the music’s inverted proportions — don’t exploit her mythology as a kinky concoction to the bursting point.

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Ryan Adams – Collection (2000-2017) [FLAC]

Ryan Adams - Collection (2000-2017) [FLAC] Download

Artist: Ryan Adams
Album: Collection
Genre: House
Year: 2000-2017
Size: ~ 5.07 gb
Source: CDs
Format: FLAC (tracks + .cue /image + .cue)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

Mixing the heartfelt angst of a singer/songwriter with the cocky brashness of a garage rocker, Ryan Adams is at once one of the few artists to emerge from the alt-country scene to achieve mainstream commercial success and the one who most strongly refused to be defined by the genre, leaping from one spot to another stylistically while following his increasingly prolific muse. Adams was born in Jacksonville, North Carolina in 1974. While country music was a major part of his family’s musical diet when he was young (he’s cited Loretta Lynn, George Jones, Merle Haggard, and Johnny Cash as particular favorites), in his early teens Adams developed a taste for punk rock and began playing electric guitar.

Faithless Street At 15, Adams started writing songs, and a year later he formed a band called the Patty Duke Syndrome; Adams once described PDS as “an arty noise punk band,” with Hsker D frequently cited as a key influence and reference point. The Patty Duke Syndrome developed a following in Jacksonville, and when Adams was 19 the band relocated to the larger town of Raleigh, North Carolina in hopes of expanding its following. However, Adams became eager to do something more melodic that would give him a platform for his country and pop influences. In 1994, Adams left the Patty Duke Syndrome and formed Whiskeytown with guitarist Phil Wandscher and violinist Caitlin Cary. With bassist Steve Grothman and drummer Eric “Skillet” Gilmore completing the lineup, Whiskeytown (the name came from regional slang for getting drunk) released their first album, Faithless Street, on the local Mood Food label.
Strangers Almanac The album won reams of critical praise in the music press, and more than one writer suggested that Whiskeytown could do for the alt-country or No Depression scene what Nirvana had done for grunge. But by the time Whiskeytown had signed to a major label — the Geffen-distributed imprint Outpost Records — the band had undergone the first in a series of major personal shakeups, and in the summer of 1997, when Whiskeytown’s Outpost debut, Stranger’s Almanac, was ready for release, Adams and Wandscher were the only official members of the group left. Cary soon returned, but Wandscher left shortly afterward, and Whiskeytown had a revolving-door lineup for much of the next two years, with the band’s live shows become increasingly erratic, as solid performances were often followed by noisy, audience-baiting disasters. Consequently, as strong as Stranger’s Almanac was, Whiskeytown never fulfilled the commercial expectations created for them by others. In 1999, the band — which was down to Adams, Cary, and a handful of session musicians — recorded its third and final album, Pneumonia, but when Geffen was absorbed in a merger between PolyGram and Universal, Outpost was phased out, and the album was shelved; shortly afterward, Whiskeytown quietly called it quits.
Heartbreaker Following Whiskeytown’s collapse, Adams wasted no time launching a career apart from the band, and after a few solo acoustic tours, Adams went into a Nashville studio with songwriters Gillian Welch and David Rawlings and cut his first album under his own name, Heartbreaker, which was released by pioneering “insurgent country” label Bloodshot Records in 2000. The album received critical raves, respectable sales, and a high-profile endorsement from Elton John, and Adams was signed by Universal’s new Americana imprint, Lost Highway Records. Lost Highway gave Whiskeytown’s Pneumonia a belated release in early 2001, and later that same year the label released his second solo set, Gold, which displayed less of a country influence in favor of classic pop and rock styles of the 1970s. In the wake of the September 11 terrorist attacks, the album’s opening track, “New York, New York,” was embraced by radio as an anthem of resilience (though it actually concerned a busted romance), and Adams once again found himself touted as “the next big thing.”
Demolition Always a prolific songwriter, in a bit more than a year following Gold’s release Adams had written and recorded enough material for four albums. He opted to whittle the 60 tunes down to a 13-song collection called Demolition, which was released in 2002 as he went into the studio to record his official follow-up to Gold. A year later, Adams’ concept album Rock n Roll was released alongside the double-EP collection Love Is Hell. Tours around the globe kept Adams busy into the next year as he maintained momentum writing songs and keeping his ever-changing presence in the music press. In May 2005, Adams released his first of three albums for Lost Highway, the melancholic double-disc Cold Roses. Jacksonville City Nights, a more classic-sounding honky tonk effort, followed in September, and 29 appeared in late December. Always prolific, in the interim period before his next album was released Adams posted a large selection of tracks — including several hip-hop tunes — on his website, but fans were greeted with more straightforward material on 2007’s Easy Tiger and 2008’s Cardinology with the Cardinals.
III/IVAdams decided to disband the Cardinals in 2009, precipitating an unusual period of quiet from the prolific singer/songwriter. He slowly returned to active duty in 2010, releasing the heavy metal Orion on vinyl-only in the summer and then issuing III/IV — a double album recorded with the Cardinals during the Easy Tiger sessions — in November. For his 13th solo album, 2011’s Ashes and Fire, the singer/songwriter recruited Norah Jones and Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers’ keyboard player Benmont Tench, as well as legendary producer Glyn Johns, who had helmed the Who classic Who’s Next.
Pax-Am Days Following Ashes and Fire, Adams’ musical career was temporarily put on hold while he suffered from an inner-ear disorder, which resulted in a collection of canceled shows. However, after hypnotherapy treatment, Adams began writing music again. As he worked on a new collection of original songs in his L.A. Pax-Am studios with guitarist/producer Mike Viola, Adams also spent time producing other artists; he helmed Fall Out Boy’s hardcore punk 2013 EP Pax-Am Days and Jenny Lewis’ lush 2014 LP, The Voyager. As it turned out, Adams released his own variations on these themes in the fall of 2014. First was a 7″ EP called 1984, which deliberately evoked the loud, fast punk-pop of Hsker D and the Replacements; then there was the gorgeous polish of Ryan Adams, his first album for Blue Note. Ryan Adams debuted at number four upon its September 2014 release, marking his highest-ever position on the Billboard 200. He quickly followed Ryan Adams with Live at Carnegie Hall, a double-disc live set, in April 2015. That live album was soon eclipsed by the news that Adams was covering Taylor Swift’s 2014 album 1989 in full, designing it as something of a sad-rock sequel to Love Is Hell. Adams’ 1989 arrived to a flurry of interest in September 2015 and saw a physical release the following month. Adams spent 2016 quietly, emerging at the end of the year to announce the release of the full-length Prisoner. Preceded by the singles “Do You Still Love Me?” and “To Be Without You,” Prisoner appeared in February of 2017.

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DVBBS – Collection (2012-2017) [WEB FLAC]

DVBBS - Collection (2012-2017) [WEB FLAC] Download

Artist: DVBBS
Album: Collection
Genre: House
Year: 2012-2017
Size: ~ 1.74 gb
Source: Digital Download
Format: FLAC (tracks)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

The electronic duo DVBBS (pronounced “dubs”) comprises brothers Christopher and Alex van den Hoef from Ontario, Canada. In the early stages of their career, the siblings joined forces with DJ Martin Sinotte, calling themselves Dubbs. In 2010, the group released the Generation Party EP and went on to tour with the likes of Steve Aoki and LMFAO. Sinotte left the group in 2012, prompting the brothers to change their name slightly from Dubbs to DVBBS. Under the new name, they released the EP Initio, fusing a variety of influences in house, electro, reggae, and dub. Their first major success came in 2013 with the track “Tsunami,” a collaboration with DJ and producer Borgeous, released on Sander van Doorn’s label Doorn Records. The single went to the top of the Dutch charts and was also a major success in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, climbing into the Top 20. A remix that featured Tinie Tempah, titled “Tsunami (Jump),” went to number one in the U.K.
Beautiful Disaster As they issued additional singles across 2014 and 2015 — including “Gold Skies” with van Doorn and Martin Garrix, and “Voodoo” with Jay Hardway — they continued to raise their profile on the global festival circuit as performers and DJs. They were slotted at number 16 on the DJ Mag Top 100 list in 2015 and held a residency at the popular dance venue Hakkasan in Las Vegas, as well as staging their own Mount Woozy Festival in Toronto. In late 2016, the pair issued Beautiful Disaster, a six-song EP that featured appearances by Juicy J, CMC$, and Stella Rio.

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Major Lazer – Collection (2009-2017) [FLAC]

Major Lazer - Collection (2009-2017) [FLAC] Download

Artist: Major Lazer
Album: Collection
Genre: House
Year: 2009-2017
Size: ~ 4.64 gb
Source: CDs, Digital download
Format: FLAC (tracks)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

A conceptual EDM act based around a fictional character, Major Lazer launched in 2008 as the digital reggae/dancehall project of Diplo, the globetrotting, taste-making DJ/producer whose previous collaborations included work for M.I.A. and Santigold. Recorded at Jamaica’s Tuff Gong studios, Major Lazer’s debut album, Guns Don’t Kill People… Lazers Do, featured producer Switch as a member. Vocal contributions came from noted dancehall stars including Vybz Kartel, Busy Signal, Mr. Vegas, and Turbulence, as well as Santigold, Nina Sky, and rapper Amanda Blank. Much anticipation and online chatter were fueled in part by the novelty video/song “Zumbi,” featuring the comedian Andy Milonakis, the frenetic, legitimate lead single “Hold the Line,” and a goofy, invented back-story about a renegade Jamaican commando with prosthetic laser arms who was allegedly a Zombie War veteran and vampire-fighting C.I.A. operative (but was demonstrably a rampant Twitter user). The album was released in June of 2009 as a joint venture between Downtown Records and Diplo’s Mad Decent label. Lazers Never Die, an EP with two new songs and three remixes, followed in 2010, along with Lazerproof, a collaborative mixtape with the English electropop duo La Roux.
Free the Universe In 2012, Snoop Dogg joined Diplo for the digital reggae single “La La La,” released under the name Snoop Lion, while Switch announced he was leaving the project. Likewise, hype man Skerrit Bwoy left in order to pursue religion. Diplo carried on with producer Jillionaire, joining the group for Free the Universe, the group’s sophomore album. The 2013 release featured Wyclef, Bruno Mars, Vybz Kartel, and Shaggy on its long guest list. Sean Paul and Pharrell Williams joined the party for the 2014 EP Apocalypse Soon, which was also the first Major Lazer release to include Walshy Fire, who had replaced Skerrit Bwoy as the group’s live MC. The 2015 album Peace Is the Mission featured the massive hit “Lean On,” plus chart-topping guests like Ariana Grande, Ellie Goulding, and 2 Chainz. It was also supported by an animated series that aired on the FXX cable television network. An extended edition of Peace Is the Mission appeared in November of 2015, sporting five bonus songs. In 2016, Major Lazer scored their biggest pop hit yet with “Cold Water” (featuring Justin Bieber and M), which topped the charts in over a dozen countries. The first single from their forthcoming 2017 LP, “Cold Water,” was followed in late 2016 by “Believer,” which featured production by Dutch duo Showtek. “Run Up,” the album’s third single, arrived in early 2017 and was a collaboration with Nicki Minaj and PartyNextDoor.

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Max Richter – Collection (2002-2017) [FLAC]

Max Richter - Collection (2002-2017) [FLAC] Download

Artist: Max Richter
Album: Collection
Genre: Classical
Year: 2002-2017
Size: ~ 8.47 gb
Source: CDs, Digital download
Format: FLAC (tracks)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

Blending classical, electronic, and rock influences into a style he calls “post-classical,” composer/programmer Max Richter ignores boundaries in favor of haunting, strangely familiar sounds. This approach made him an in-demand composer for film and other types of performing arts, as well as an acclaimed artist in his own right. Born in Germany in the mid-’60s, Richter and his family moved to the U.K. when he was still a little boy; by his early teens, he was listening to the canon of classical music, as well as modern composers including Philip Glass, whose sound was a major influence on Richter. The Clash, the Beatles, and Pink Floyd were also important, along with the early electronic music scene; inspired by artists such as Kraftwerk, Richter built his own analog instruments. He studied composition and piano at Edinburgh University, the Royal Academy of Music, and in Florence with Luciano Berio. Richter then became a founding member of the Piano Circus, a contemporary classical group that played works by Glass, Brian Eno, Steve Reich, Arvo Prt, and Julia Wolfe, and also incorporated found sounds and video into their performances.

Dead Cities After ten years and five albums, Richter left the group and became more involved in the U.K.’s thriving electronica scene, collaborating with the Future Sound of London on Dead Cities (which features a track named after him) and Isness; he also contributed orchestrations to Roni Size’s In the Mode. Richter’s own work evolved from the Xenakis-inspired music of his early days into something that included his electronic and pop influences: 2002’s Memoryhouse introduced his mix of modern composition, electronica, and field recordings, and the following year’s stunning Blue Notebooks — inspired by Kafka’s Blue Octavo Notebooks — showed off a more streamlined, and more affecting, version of this sound. Released in 2006, Songs from Before paired Richter’s plaintive sound with texts written by Haruki Murakami and delivered by Robert Wyatt. Two years later, 24 Postcards in Full Colour, a collection of elaborate ringtones, was released, and 2008 also saw the release of Richter’s score for the film Waltz with Bashir.
InfraRichter worked on several other film scores, including music for Benedek Fliegauf’s Womb, Alex Gibney’s My Trip to Al Qaeda, and David MacKenzie’s The Last Word. Another scoring project was Infra, which Richter was commissioned to compose in 2008. A ballet inspired by T.S. Eliot’s classic poem “The Wasteland,” Infra premiered that November at London’s Royal Opera House. Richter re-recorded and expanded his music for the 2010 album Infra, his fourth release for Fat Cat Records. Throughout the 2010s, Richter alternated between soundtrack work and other projects, including the award-winning scores to Die Fremde and Lore and Recomposed by Max Richter: Vivaldi – The Four Seasons, an avant-garde reworking of the composer’s timeless set of violin concertos. Disconnect, the score to Henry-Alex Rubin’s film about the impact of technology on relationships, was released in 2013. His score for Wadjda, which revolved around an 11-year-old girl and was the first feature-length film made by a Saudi Arabian woman (director Haifaa Al-Mansour), arrived that July. Richter issued three more film scores that year, including the music to Ritesh Batra’s Lunchbox and Ruair Robinson’s sci-fi excursion The Last Days on Mars.
Max Richter: Sleep [8 Hour Version] In 2014, Richter launched an ongoing mentorship program for aspiring young composers. The following year saw the arrival of Sleep, an eight-hour ambient piece scored for piano, strings, electronics, and vocals, which Richter described as a “lullaby for a frenetic world and a manifesto for a slower pace of existence.” The piece premiered at a Berlin performance where the audience was given beds instead of seats. Sleep and From Sleep, a one-hour adaptation, were released in September 2015. Richter returned in 2016 with the music for an episode of Black Mirror. It was soon followed by 2017’s Three Worlds: Music from Woolf Works, which drew from his score for Wayne McGregor’s three-act Royal Ballet production inspired by three of Virginia Woolf’s most acclaimed novels.

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Tangerine Dream – Collection (1970-2013) [FLAC]

Tangerine Dream - Collection (1970-2013) [FLAC] Download

Artist: Tangerine Dream
Album: Collection
Genre: Electronic
Year: 1970-2013
Size: ~ 33.1 gb
Source: CDs
Format: APE (image + .cue)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

Without doubt, the recordings of Tangerine Dream made the greatest impact on the widest variety of instrumental music during the 1980s and ’90s, ranging from the most atmospheric new age and space music to the harshest abrasions of electronic dance. Founded in 1967 by Edgar Froese in Berlin, the group progressed through a full three dozen lineups (Froese being the only continuous member with staying power) and four distinct stages of development: the experimentalist minimalism of the late ’60s and early ’70s; stark sequencer trance during the mid- to late ’70s, the group’s most influential period; an organic form of instrumental music on their frequent film and studio work during the 1980s; and, finally, a more propulsive dance style, which showed Tangerine Dream with a sound quite similar to their electronic inheritors in the field of dance music.

Electronic MeditationFroese, born in Tilsit, East Prussia, in 1944, was little influenced by music while growing up. Instead, he looked to the Dadaist and Surrealist art movements for inspiration, as well as literary figures such as Gertrude Stein, Henry Miller, and Walt Whitman. He organized multimedia events at the residence of Salvador Dali in Spain during the mid-’60s and began to entertain the notion of combining his artistic and literary influences with music; Froese played in a musical combo called the Ones, which recorded just one single before dissolving in 1967. The first lineup of Tangerine Dream formed later that year, with Froese on guitar, bassist Kurt Herkenberg, drummer Lanse Hapshash, flutist Volker Hombach, and vocalist Charlie Prince. The quintet aligned itself with contemporary American acid rock (the Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane), and played around Berlin at various student events. The lineup lasted only two years, and by 1969 Froese had recruited wind player Conrad Schnitzler and drummer Klaus Schulze. One of the trio’s early rehearsals, not originally intended for release, became the first Tangerine Dream LP when Germany’s Ohr Records issued Electronic Meditation in June 1970. The LP was a playground for obtuse music-making — keyboards, several standard instruments, and a variety of household objects were recorded and filtered through several effects processors, creating a sparse, experimentalist atmosphere.
Both Schulze and Schnitzler left for solo careers later in 1970, and Froese replaced them the following year with drummer Christopher Franke and organist Steve Schroeder. When Schroeder left a year later, Tangerine Dream gained its most stable lineup core when organist Peter Baumann joined the fold. The trio of Froese, Franke, and Baumann would continue until Baumann’s departure in 1977, and even then, Froese and Franke would compose the spine of the group for an additional decade.

Alpha Centauri On 1971’s Alpha Centauri and the following year’s Zeit, the trio’s increased use of synthesizers and a growing affinity for space music resulted in albums that pushed the margin for the style. Atem, released in 1973, finally gained Tangerine Dream widespread attention outside Europe; influential British DJ John Peel named it his LP of the year, and the group signed a five-year contract with Richard Branson’s Virgin Records. Though less than a year old, Virgin had already become a major player in the recording industry, thanks to the massive success of Mike Oldfield’s Tubular Bells (widely known for its use in the film The Exorcist).
PhaedraTangerine Dream’s first album for Virgin, Phaedra, was a milestone not only for the group, but for instrumental music. Branson had allowed the group free rein at Virgin’s Manor Studios, where they used Moog synthesizers and sequencers for the first time; the result was a relentless, trance-inducing barrage of rhythm and sound, an electronic update of the late-’60s and early-’70s classical minimalism embodied by Terry Riley. Though mainstream critics were unsurprisingly hostile toward the album (it obviously made no pretense to rock & roll in any form), Phaedra broke into the British Top 20 and earned Tangerine Dream a large global audience.
Rubycon The follow-ups Rubycon and the live Ricochet were also based on the blueprint with which Phaedra had been built, but the release of Stratosfear in 1976 saw the use of more organic instruments such as untreated piano and guitar; also, the group added vocals for 1978’s Cyclone, a move that provoked much criticism from their fans. Both of these innovations didn’t change the sound in a marked degree, however; their incorporation into rigid sequencer patterns continued to distance Tangerine Dream from the mainstream of contemporary instrumental music.
TangramBaumann left for a solo career in 1978 (later founding the Private Music label), and was replaced briefly by keyboard player Steve Jolliffe and then Johannes Schmoelling, another important member of Tangerine Dream who would stay until the mid-’80s. In 1980, the Froese/Franke/Schmoelling lineup was unveiled at the Palast der Republik in East Berlin, the first live performance by a Western group behind the Iron Curtain. Tangerine Dream also performed live on TV with the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra one year later, and premiered their studio work on 1980’s Tangram.
Mike Oldfield had shown the effectiveness of using new instrumental music forms as a bed for film on Tubular Bells, and in 1977 The Exorcist’s director, William Friedkin, had tapped Tangerine Dream for soundtrack work on his film Sorcerer. By the time the new lineup stabilized in 1981, Hollywood was knocking on the band’s door; Tangerine Dream worked on more than 30 film soundtracks during the 1980s, among them Risky Business, The Keep, Flashpoint, Firestarter, Vision Quest, and Legend. If the idea of stand-alone electronic music hadn’t entered the minds of mainstream America before this time, the large success of these soundtracks (especially Risky Business) entrenched the idea and proved enormously influential to soundtrack composers from all fields.

Hyperborea Despite all the jetting between Hollywood and Berlin, the group continued to record proper LPs and tour the world as well. Hyperborea, released in 1983, was their last album for Virgin, and a move to Zomba/Jive Records signaled several serious changes for the band during the late ’80s. After the first Zomba release (a live concert recorded in Warsaw), 1985’s Le Parc marked the first time Tangerine Dream had flirted with sampling technology. The use of sampled material was an important decision to make for a group that had always investigated the philosophy of sound and music with much care, though Le Parc was a considerable success — both fans and critics calling it their best LP in a decade. Tyger, released in 1987, featured more vocals than any previous Tangerine Dream LP, and many of the group’s fans were quite dispirited in their disfavor.
Optical RaceSchmoelling left in 1988, to be replaced by the classically trained Paul Haslinger and (for a brief time) Ralf Wadephul. Optical Race, released in 1988, was the first Tangerine Dream album to appear on old bandmate Peter Baumann’s Private Music label. Several more albums followed for the label, after which Haslinger left to work on composing film scores in Los Angeles. His replacement, and the only other permanent member of Tangerine Dream in the years to follow, was Edgar’s son Jerome Froese (whose photo had graced the cover of several TD albums in the past). Another record label change, to Miramar, preceded the release of 1992’s Rockoon, which earned Tangerine Dream one of their seven total Grammy nominations. The duo continued to record and release live albums, remix albums, studio albums, and soundtracks at the rate of about two releases per year into the late ’90s. Meanwhile, the influence of Tangerine Dream’s ’70s releases upon a generation of electronica and dance artists became increasingly evident, from the Orb’s indebted ambient techno to DJ Shadow’s sampling of Stratosfear’s “Invisible Limits,” heard on “Changeling,” from 1996’s Endtroducing….
Jeanne d’Arc During the early 2000s, new material surfaced at a slightly slower rate. In addition to a handful of studio albums — including 2005’s Jeanne d’Arc, for which Froese was first joined by Thorsten Quaeschning, a musician who would figure into several subsequent TD releases — and a couple soundtracks (Great Wall of China, Mota Atma), there was “the Dante trilogy” (Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso, released from 2002 through 2006) and the five-part “atomic seasons” (with titles like Springtime in Nagasaki and Winter in Hiroshima, created for a Japanese man who survived the bombings of both cities). During these years, keeping tabs on archival releases, both live and studio, was more challenging than ever; most prominently, there was The Bootmoon Series, comprising audience and soundboard recordings of performances dating back to 1977, as well as reissues of the first four albums and several anthologies. Despite so much focus on the past, epitomized by 40th anniversary concerts that took place in 2007, Tangerine Dream remained equally connected to the present. Sadly, however, the group’s long journey under the continued creative guidance of Edgar Froese came to an end when Froese died suddenly of a pulmonary embolism in Vienna in January 2015 at the age of 70.

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DJ Snake – Collection (2013-2017) [FLAC]

DJ Snake - Collection (2013-2017) [FLAC] Download

Artist: DJ Snake
Album: Collection
Genre: House
Year: 2013-2017
Size: ~ 2.69 gb
Source: CDs, Digital download
Format: FLAC (tracks)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

A Grammy-nominated producer, DJ Snake is a Frenchman at the forefront of the trap music movement, having taken the genre to the charts with his 2013 single “Turn Down for What” featuring Lil Jon. Born William Grigahcine, Snake’s production work on Lady Gaga’s 2011 effort Born This Way earned him a Grammy nod when it was nominated for Album of the Year in 2012. Also in 2012, he signed with Diplo’s imprint Mad Decent and released the single “Bird Machine” on the label in 2013. The singles “Slow Down” and “Together” also arrived in 2013, along with more work for Gaga on her ARTPOP album. His big break as a solo artist came late in the year when “Turn Down for What,” featuring Lil Jon, arrived and became the most popular crossover trap hit since Baauer’s “Harlem Shake.” In 2014 he collaborated with Dillon Francis on the single “Get Low,” while 2015 saw him join M and Major Lazer on the worldwide hit “Lean On.” His 2016 solo single “Middle” featured guest vocalist Bipolar Sunshine, and preceded his debut album Encore.

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Rhino Bucket – Discography (1990-2017) [FLAC]

Rhino Bucket - Discography (1990-2017) [FLAC] Download

Artist: Rhino Bucket
Album: Discography
Genre: Hard Rock
Year: 1990-2017
Size: ~ 4.36 gb
Source: CDs
Format: FLAC (image + .cue)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

To put it simply, Rhino Bucket sound exactly like Bon Scott-era AC/DC, something for which the band makes no apologies. Furthermore, what could easily be passed off as mere plagiarism becomes instead a celebration of the original masterpiece thanks to Rhino Bucket’s bold-faced indifference and oftentimes fantastic songs. They also deserve some credit for coming up with one of the most original and bizarre names in rock history.

Wayne’s World Formed in Van Nuys, California in 1987 by Finnish-born transplant Georg Dolivo (Bon Scott-cloned vocals and guitar), lead guitarist Greg Fields, bassist Reeve Downes, and drummer Liam Jason, Rhino Bucket perfectly replicated AC/DC’s raw, three-chord boogie to perfection on their self-titled debut album. But while they were quickly embraced by the U.K. and European press, the band was faced with nothing but apathy and scorn in America, where they were pegged as rip-off artists and received little promotional support from their label. Despite the inclusion of one of its tracks, “Ride with Yourself,” in Mike Myers’ popular Wayne’s World movie, their aptly titled second album, 1992’s Get Used to It, also failed to make any headway, and the band was soon unceremoniously dropped by Reprise. Still they soldiered on, and in an ironic twist of fate, recruited former AC/DC skin-pounder Simon Wright to replace the departed Liam Jason for their third album, 1994’s independently released Pain. Rhino Bucket finally called it a day the following year, but eventually re-formed in 2001 with plans to record a new album. After a lengthy hiatus, the group returned in 2006 with And Then It Got Ugly, which saw Brian Forsythe of Kix taking over lead guitar duties. In 2008 the band appeared on the soundtrack of director Darren Aronofsky’s Oscar-winning sports drama The Wrestler, and the following year saw the group release their fifth studio long-player, The Hardest Town. Who’s Got Mine? dropped in 2011, followed by another olympic bout of touring that saw the band play a relentless string of shows both at home and abroad. After a short break from the studio, Rhino Bucket returned with their seventh full-length, The Last Real Rock N’ Roll, in 2017.

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The Human League – Collection (1979-2016) [FLAC]

The Human League - Collection (1979-2016) [FLAC] Download

Artist: The Human League
Album: Collection
Genre: Synthpop
Year: 1979-2016
Size: ~ 9.68 gb
Source: CDs, Digital download
Format: FLAC (image + .cue / tracks + .cue / tracks)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

Synth pop’s first international superstars, the Human League were among the earliest and most innovative bands to break into the pop mainstream on a wave of synthesizers and electronic rhythms, their marriage of infectious melodies and state-of-the-art technology proving enormously influential on countless acts following in their wake. The group was formed in Sheffield, England in 1977 by synth players Martyn Ware and Ian Marsh, who’d previously teamed as the duo Dead Daughters. Following a brief tenure as the Future, a period during which they added and lost synthesizer player Adi Newton and enlisted vocalist Philip Oakey, they rechristened themselves the Human League. The trio recorded a demo and played their first live dates. The slide presentations of “director of visuals” Adrian Wright quickly became a key component of their performances.

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Reproduction After they signed with the indie label Fast, the Human League issued their first single, “Being Boiled,” in 1978. A minor underground hit, it was followed by a tour in support of Siouxsie & the Banshees. After a 1979 EP, the instrumental The Dignity of Labour, the group released its first full-length effort, Reproduction, a dark, dense work influenced largely by Kraftwerk. Travelogue followed the next year and reached the U.K. Top 20. Still, internal tensions forced Ware and Marsh to quit the group in late 1980, at which time they formed Heaven 17. Their departure forced Wright to learn to play the synthesizer; at the same time, Oakey recruited bassist Ian Burden as well as a pair of teenagers, Susanne Sulley and Joanne Catherall, to handle additional vocal duties.
Dare The first single from the revamped Human League, 1981’s “Boys and Girls,” reached the British Top 50. Recorded with producer Martin Rushent, the slicker follow-up “Sound of the Crowd” fell just shy of the Top Ten. Their next single, “Love Action,” reached number three, and after adding ex-Rezillo Jo Callis, the League issued “Open Your Heart,” another hit. Still, their true breakthrough was “Don’t You Want Me.” The classic single, as well as parent album Dare!, both topped their respective charts in England, and went on to become major hits in the U.S. as well. A tour of the States followed, but new music was extremely slow in forthcoming. After a Rushent remix disc, Love and Dancing, the Human League finally issued 1983’s Fascination! EP and scored a pair of hits with “Mirror Man” and “(Keep Feeling) Fascination.”
Hysteria The much-anticipated full-length Hysteria finally surfaced in mid-1984, heralding a more forceful sound than earlier Human League releases. The record failed to match the massive success of Dare!, however, with the single “The Lebanon” earning insignificant airplay. The group soon went on indefinite hiatus, and Oakey recorded a 1985 solo LP with famed producer Giorgio Moroder titled simply Philip Oakey & Giorgio Moroder. To the surprise of many, the Human League resurfaced in 1986 with Crash, produced by the duo of Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis. The plaintive lead single “Human” soon topped the U.S. charts, but the group didn’t capitalize on the comeback success and disappeared from the charts for the remainder of the decade.
Romantic? When the Human League finally returned in 1990 with Romantic?, their commercial momentum had again dissipated. The single “Heart Like a Wheel” barely managed to rise into the Top 40. The record was the band’s last with longtime label Virgin. As a trio consisting of Oakey, Sulley, and Catherall, they ultimately signed with the EastWest label and teamed with producer Ian Stanley for 1995’s Octopus. The album went largely unnoticed both at home and overseas, with the single “Stay with Me Tonight” issued solely in the U.K.
Secrets A resurgent interest in synth pop and post-punk during the early 2000s enabled the group’s 2001 album Secrets, which saw the group update its early sound, considerable press coverage. In 2002, previously unreleased recordings of the Future and the embryonic Human League were compiled for The Golden Hour of the Future. Steady touring continued for several years, as documented on Live at the Dome. Additionally, there were performances of Dare! in its entirety and a Steel City Tour with Heaven 17 and fellow Sheffield natives ABC. The Human League remained connected to their local roots in the studio as well. Credo, released in 2011, was produced by fellow Sheffield natives I Monster. The career-spanning anthology A Very British Synthesizer Group was issued five years later, promoted with performance dates across Europe.

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Massive Attack – Collection (1991-2016) [FLAC]

Massive Attack - Collection (1991-2016) [FLAC] Download

Artist: Massive Attack
Album: Collection
Genre: Trip Hop
Year: 1991-2016
Size: ~ 6.46 gb
Source: CDs, Digital download
Format: FLAC (image + .cue / tracks + .cue / tracks)
Quality: lossless
Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz / 16 Bit

Description:

One of the most innovative and influential groups of their generation, Massive Attack’s hypnotic sound — a darkly sensual and cinematic fusion of hip-hop rhythms, soulful melodies, dub grooves, and choice samples — informed decades worth of acclaimed dance and rock artists including Portishead, Beth Orton, Radiohead, TV on the Radio, and Tricky, a Massive Attack alumnus.

Their history dates back to 1983 and the formation of the Wild Bunch, one of the earliest and most successful sound system/DJ collectives to arrive on the U.K. music scene. Renowned for their seamless integration of a wide range of musical styles, from punk to reggae to R&B, the group’s parties quickly became can’t-miss events for the Bristol club crowd, and at the peak of their popularity they drew crowds so enormous that the local live music scene essentially ground to a halt.

Blue Lines When the Wild Bunch folded during the mid-’80s, two of its members — Andrew “Mushroom” Vowles and Grant “Daddy G” Marshall — teamed with local graffiti artist 3D (born Robert del Naja) to form Massive Attack in 1987. Another Wild Bunch alum, Nellee Hooper, split his time between the new group and his other project, Soul II Soul. The group’s first single, “Daydreaming,” appeared in 1990, featuring the sultry vocals of singer Shara Nelson and raps by Tricky, another one-time Wild Bunch collaborator. The classic “Unfinished Sympathy” followed, as did another compelling effort, “Safe from Harm.” Finally, in 1991 Massive Attack issued their debut LP, Blue Lines. While by no means a huge commercial success, the record was met with major critical praise, and was dubbed an instant classic in many quarters. Nelson, featured on many of the album’s most memorable tracks, exited for a solo career soon after, and the group then changed its name to simply “Massive” to avoid any implication of approval for the U.N.’s policy toward Iraq.
Protection After a three-year layoff, Massive Attack — their full name now properly reinstated — resurfaced with Protection. Again working with Hooper and Tricky, they also brought into the fold vocalist Nicolette, as well as Everything But the Girl’s Tracey Thorn. Three singles — “Karmacoma,” “Sly,” and the title track — were released from the LP, which was also remixed in its entirety by Mad Professor and issued as No Protection. A lengthy tour followed, and over the next several years, Massive Attack’s solo work was primarily confined to remixes for artists including Garbage. They also worked with Madonna on a track for a Marvin Gaye tribute album. Finally, to promote their appearance at the annual Glastonbury music festival, the group issued the EP Risingson during the summer of 1997.
Mezzanine The third full-length Massive Attack effort, Mezzanine, appeared in mid-1998. In addition to reggae singer Horace Andy making his third consecutive LP appearance with the group, vocal chores were handled by the Cocteau Twins’ Elizabeth Fraser and newcomer Sara Jay. Mezzanine became a hit among critics, clubs, and the college crowds, spinning successful singles such as “Teardrop” and “Inertia Creeps.” The album topped the U.K. chart and crossed into the Top 60 of the Billboard 200 in the U.S. A tour of America and Europe followed, but Vowles left the band after disagreeing with the artistic direction of Mezzanine. Del Naja and Marshall continued as a duo, later working with the likes of David Bowie and the Dandy Warhols, but Marshall later took a brief leave of absence to raise his family; producer Neil Davidge took up the slack.
100th Window In February 2003, after a five-year wait, Massive Attack released their fourth album, 100th Window, including collaborations with mainstay Horace Andy as well as Sinad O’Connor. Danny the Dog, released in 2004, marked the group’s entry into film score work and, perhaps unsurprisingly, often sounded much more like incidental background music than a typical Massive Attack release. From there, Del Naja and Davidge scored a handful of other films — In Prison My Whole Life, Battle in Seattle, and Trouble the Water, for which they earned an Oscar nomination — but their work was credited to their real names or the pseudonym 100 Suns rather than Massive Attack. The fifth Massive Attack album, Heligoland, released in 2010, featured collaborations with Horace Andy, TV on the Radio’s Tunde Adebimpe, Elbow’s Guy Garvey, and Martina Topley-Bird. Burial remixed the album’s “Paradise Circus” and the unreleased “Four Walls” for a limited 12″ release in 2011. The group returned in 2016 with a four-track EP, Ritual Spirit, on which they were joined by Tricky, Roots Manuva, and Young Fathers. Del Naja and Heligoland contributor Euan Dickinson were credited as co-producers.

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